Tafe Fashion Design Course and Merchandiser

The fashion industry has undergone a complete change in the recent times and the distance certifications for same are required for achieving success in fashion world. Fashion technology is becoming the fastest and entrenched industry in today’s world. All budding designers are working hard to develop new designs and brands which help companies sell their clothes, jewellery and footwear. The fashion Industry is widespread and requires creative ideas along with dedication for work for any designer to be famous.

Milan and Toronto are the famous Fashion Hotspots where the best designers and budding talents display their collections and perform shows. Today with various universities and institutes offering Fashion Designing courses which have facilities to teach the technical software’s of CAD and Patternmaker, are becoming increasing popular. Tafe fashion design course with the help of distance education help students reach them removing the barriers of countries. The courses available also offer specialization in Children / Menswear / Womenswear and even Bridal for designers to choose from. One such name in the education arena is TAFE.

TAFE

Tafe offers various courses which include the “Advanced Diploma of Fashion Design and Technology”. This course is specifically designed to train budding designers and help talented students develop their creativity through in specialized areas of Fashion Designing.

Course Details

Tafe fashion design course offers the Fashion Designing Diploma for students who are willing to apply practical, creative and technical knowledge in the field. Various aspects like design application and product development for management level students are also covered in the Course. Complete research is done by students while studying this course on topics from garment realization, fine patternmaking, fitting, interior, construction, merchandising and sizing which shall be used in the Fashion Industry.

Any successful and well equipped course for Fashion Designing shall include garment cutting and block construction which are the most essential aspects of garment design which are a part of the TAFE Diploma Course. The course consists of elective subjects like grading techniques, fashion development through patternmaking, fashion illustration, fabric manipulation, textile fibre, pattern draping, lingerie design, design elements, fabric sketching, swimwear design, sizing design, CAD and specialized software developed for computer fashion designing and selling concepts are available.

Merchandiser concept is also increasing today which is resulting in extensive design research for better quality and designs. Besides the basic cloth, jewelry is also being designed by various designers which is giving the industry a new look and arena to showcase. Students from Indian cities like Delhi and Mumbai which are hubs for fashion designing are aspiring to undergo the certification provided by TAFE. Delhi and Mumbai are two bog fashion centers in India. This course facilitates subject which shall help the student develop expertise in AQF5 level. Fashion production management and supply chain are vital components of the course curriculum which help in developing creative and critical thinking required for the fashion world and merchandiser concept. Applications.

The course is industry specific and is much more proactive than various similar courses offered by universities worldwide. This full time course can be undergone for a period of 3 years which provides Certificate IV LMT41007. This is the Applied Fashion Design and Technology Certification which is recognized all over the world and has greater industry acceptance for employment. Various Managerial level positions can be easily acquired after this certification in the Fashion Industry. The information on tafe fashion design course can be availed online from the websites. The Certificate subjects and details regarding fees and locations are displayed on the website. Before entering the Fashion industry one must get quality certification from renowned institute and TAFE is the first name that comes to one’s mind.

Becoming a Fashion Designer

It seems like everyone is jumping on the designer bandwagon these days. And why not? The fashion industry is sexy – fashion shows, parties, celebrities, recognition, and even fame go along with a career in fashion.

Now herein lies the question: do you go to design school or go straight to starting a business? Not all fashion designers go the traditional route to design school, instead drawing on an entrepreneurial spirit, some “designers” turn their head for business into a thriving fashion enterprise.

Ralph Lauren is an example of a fashion designer who bypassed the sewing machine and headed straight for the marketplace. Which path you take depends on your personal motivation. If you love sewing and pattern making, the traditional route is going to bring the most satisfaction. If you love the fashion world but don’t have the patience for needle and thread, a career in the fast-paced and exciting fashion biz is still possible … read on.

So you want to go out on your own, what’s first?

You’ve always admired fashion designers and their ability to design trendy, unique and wearable fashions season after season, as if by magic. But it’s not magic; it’s a business. And to succeed in business, nobody is an island (meaning that everyone needs a little help to accomplish his or her dreams). And it’s not all glitz and glamour. Being a fashion designer means you have to actually run a business.

Before you print up those business cards, ask yourself if you’re prepared to roll up your sleeves and tackle the not-so fun aspects of fashion.

At first, running a fashion business could mean fulfilling orders yourself (i.e., packing boxes until the wee hours of the morning), steaming clothes repeatedly during fashion shows, and bookkeeping. You could spend only a small percentage of your time actually designing; instead you’re networking, schmoozing and negotiating with suppliers and vendors.

If you’re planning to take the direct-to-consumer path, you’ll have to create a website and maintain it (and most likely have to pay someone to handle these tasks), get a merchant account to process credit card transactions and manage charge back cycles. If you’re not interested in learning what these things mean, then you may decide to work for a large fashion house to learn the ropes.

But if you have the endurance and enough friends with skills or services you can trade for, you could go out on your own and succeed. Today is the age of entrepreneurship, why shouldn’t you get a piece of the pie?


The fashion biz: a reality check

Exciting industries are rife with competition-some that will fade away and others that will give you a run for your money. You have to compete against the big names out there and trendy emerging designers fresh out of the best design schools or veterans of big fashion houses-not to mention all the celebrities popping up with their own labels.

Running your own fashion biz may require you to reach out to suppliers and potential customers all over the world, which means you better be organized. Are you prepared to coordinate the procurement of raw materials like fabric, trim and hardware, so that your manufacturer gets what they need at the right time to deliver a finished product on deadline?

Think of yourself as a business person first and a fashion designer second. If your fashion business fails, you’re the one that suffers. Always keep the business aspect in the forefront of your mind. Some people find this prospect exhilarating, while others can’t think of anything more horrifying. Still interested in starting your own fashion business?

I’m not a designer, can I still work in the fashion industry?

Yes … and no. If you have the design vision, you can pay people to take your idea and turn it into a tangible pattern or design. This is sort of like what a creative director does. If this fits your situation, then you’d better have the business chops to get your business off the ground and you’d better have a solid Core Value Proposition.

What this means is that you must have a strong business proposal and offer a product that’s valuable and in demand. That doesn’t mean you have to sell high-end couture clothing to rich people. Clothiers H&M and Zara focus on fast ready-to-wear fashion at affordable pricepoints.

There is more than one path to becoming a fashion designer. You can learn to sew and go to design school to learn the ins-and-outs of the business. But not everyone learns to draw patterns and stitch together garments. The keys to succeeding in the fashion business are creativity, a good business sense and determination.

Stay tuned for more advice on becoming a fashion designer.

Top 10 Indian Fashion Designers

The Indian fashion industry has changed drastically over the years and India has evolved as one the most fashion conscious nations in the world. Thanks to some incredibly creative and dynamic fashion designers, Indian fashion has made its mark on the global platform. Check out the fashion designers who are ruling the roost in the fashion circle of the country.

Sabyasachi Mukherjee

A noted fashion designer from Kolkata, Sabyasachi is the king of traditional clothing. He graduated from NIFT in 1999 and just a couple of years later bagged the Femina British Council’s most outstanding young designer of India award. Cultural traditions of Kolkata, gypsies and antique textiles are his inspiration. His collections are a part of several multi-designer stores in India and his recent collections aim to project India in a new light.

Manish Malhotra

A top-notch fashion designer, Manish’s designs have been adored by many leading actresses in Bollywood. Manish is one of the first costume designers who ventured into the mainstream fashion with his high-profile couture store in 1999. He is known for creating glamorous designs with traditional Indian textures, colors and embroideries.

Tarun Tahiliani

A famous fashion designer born in Mumbai, Tarun is known for combining traditional aesthetics with modern design. He opened India’s first up-market boutique, Ensemble, which revolutionized Indian fashion. Tarun’s designer clothes are in huge demand in London, New York, Tokyo, Dubai and Hong Kong.

JJ Valaya

A master of great bridal collections and hand embroideries, JJ Valaya is one of the best Indian fashion designers. He founded House of Valaya, a luxury fashion and lifestyle house in 1992. Fusion of traditional crafts and contemporary haute is Valaya’s specialty.

Wendell Rodricks

Wendell started his career as a catering graduate, but found his true calling in fashion designing. His passion for white is well-known and his minimalist chic style is a rage among Indian fashion lovers. Wendell is India’s first designer to be invited to IGEDO, the largest garment fair in the world.

Ritu Beri

The first Indian designer to present her collections in Paris, Ritu’s ready-to-wear line earned her rave reviews from the French media. She created her first line of clothing, Lavanya, in 1990 and has designed clothes for Bill Clinton, Prince Charles, Nicole Kidman, Madhuri Dixit and Rani Mukherji.

Neeta Lulla

A renowned Indian designer, Neeta has won the National Film Award on four occasions for the best costume design. In a career spanning over two decades, she has won numerous international accolades too. Her creations are known for their royalty, grace and richness.

Rina Dhaka

Rina emerged in the fashion world in the late 1980s and is one of the most creative and innovative designers of the country. Rina is best known for her theme collections and her forte is western wear. Prominent magazines such as Vogue and Elle have featured her works.

Rohit Bal

Rohit is best known for using peacock and lotus motifs and his creations are handcrafted to near perfection. He pays great attention to detail and has designed clothes for celebrities like Pamela Anderson, Anna Kournikova, Uma Thurman and Cindy Crawford.

Ritu Kumar

Ritu Kumar’s designs offer a great fusion of sophistication and euphoria. She is known to create designs with an amalgamation of contemporary and age old craftsmanship. A veteran fashion designer, she has helped the industry to reach new heights.

Fashion Design Skills 101 – Skills That Fashion Schools Don’t Cover Nearly Enough

In fashion school, most of your time was spent learning to create fashion illustrations, draping, sewing, and flat patternmaking. While these are good skills to have, they aren’t very practical when you’re trying to land your first job in the fashion industry. In the real world you’ll be expected to know how to create computerized flat sketches, develop garment specs, CADs, and presentation boards. And I know some of you are thinking “But I learned those things in school too!” To which I reply: You think you know, but you have no idea! Take it from experience: fashion schools don’t focus on those skills nearly enough to fully prepare you for your first design position. In this article I will discuss each skill and its importance in the fashion industry.

Draping and Patternmaking – Low Importance
While patternmaking and draping are valuable skills, they usually only come in handy when you deal with a lot of fits. However, fittings are usually conducted by technical design teams so if you got into fashion for creative reasons, you’ll most likely be miserable in this type of position. On the creative side of design, all you need is a basic understanding of what creates a good fit, and how to fix a bad one. In the majority of design positions, hands-on patternmaking skills are not necessary, unless you plan to enter Project Runway!

Sewing – Low Importance
On the creative side of design, sewing isn’t that relevant. Yes, it’s good to understand the general concepts of garment construction, but you don’t need to be a great seamstress. On the job, if you need to know how a certain garment is constructed, there are tons of references available: from clothes at the stores, to “how to” books and online articles. The point I’m trying to make is: if you’re sewing skills leave something to be desired, don’t stress over it.

Illustration – Almost Unnecessary
Sadly, fashion illustrations are a dying art in the industry – they are scarcely used by designers in the real world. The fashion illustration has been replaced with computer drawn stylized technical sketches (floats) or more accurate technical flats, which are faster to sketch and much more practical. Not only do they present a clear representation of design concept, but they are a must have for production. Flats can be turned into CADs and can be used in mood/presentation boards. Fashion schools have not followed this shift and still focus more heavily on illustrations, and not enough on flat sketching.

Computer Programs – Must Know
I can’t stress enough the importance of knowing popular computer applications for creating floats, flats and CADs. Most companies expect proficiency in Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Microsoft Excel since they are relatively affordable in comparison to more industry specific software. Unfortunately, the coverage of Illustrator and Photoshop provided by fashion schools does not meet the actual demands of the fashion industry. Many companies are also requesting knowledge of WebPDM, so if your college offers a course in this program, it would be to your benefit to take it. If your school does not teach this program, find a school or venue that does offer this program and take it!

Flat Sketching – Must Know
While interviewing candidates for design positions, we’ve seen applicants’ portfolios filled with beautiful illustrations and then say “That’s nice, but can you flat sketch?” If flats are included in their portfolios, they are usually basic, lack important details, and are not visually appealing. If the candidates sketches are halfway decent; my next question is “do you know Illustrator and Photoshop? ” Almost everyone says yes, but it’s usually far from the truth.

A lot of fashion school grads seriously believe that they know these programs well, but what you learned in school isn’t enough – fashion schools don’t teach these skills well enough for entry level designers to be competent within the fashion industry. Schools just cover basics, which are usually forgotten without practice. Take the extra effort to practice and become comfortable with Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and other programs beyond what schools teach: read books and take additional courses (offered in either classroom or online settings).

Creating Specs in a Copycat Industry – Must Know
Knowing how to spec (measure and detail) a garment to create garment specifications, or “specs” is a fundamental skill. Many companies create their spec sheets using Excel. Although garment sizes and measurements vary from company to company, depending on different market segments and categories, if you know the principles, you’ll be able to quickly adapt to the standards of any company. You don’t even need to know how to develop specs from scratch!

As a head designer, to set spec standards for a company, I usually went to different stores, found garments with a good fit and copied the basic measurements. This is quite common – the fashion industry is a copycat industry- most fashions hanging in the stores are knock-offs of another company. Once, during a shopping trip in London, a store salesperson noticed I was a fashion designer collecting style ideas. He mentioned that his store received a constant flow of American design companies such as Calvin Klein, whose designers come to knockoff their merchandise. That’s right – even top designer brands use knockoffs for their ready-to-wear collections. There are even official terms: a “knockoff” is when a style is copied and a “rub-off” is when patterns are copied.

Educate Yourself!
Many fashion schools such as FIT in New York (Fashion Institute of Technology) offer important classes like “flats and specs for the fashion industry”, but believe it or not, these courses are not required by the curriculum! Another handy course that should be taken is “creative fashion presentation.” Salespeople use presentations a lot as visual aids. In addition they create a good impression and convey creativity level. If you can make outstanding presentations you’ll be assigned to do them often, and believe me it’s more fun to make boards than do fits or send faxes and organize showrooms.

To sum up: in order to get a job before the rest of the entry level fashion design candidates, you need to focus on refining skills that are highly demanded in the industry. Become proficient with flat sketching, include flats in your portfolio, and be extremely comfortable and knowledgeable in Illustrator and Photoshop. Not only will you be ready with the skills you need to succeed in fashion, but discussing how you went the extra mile to keep up with industry standards will definitely impress any prospective employer!

For your reference and use, we have posted lots of industry standard flat sketches and CADs in JPEG and vector (Illustrator) formats on DesignersNexus.com. If you can improve your skills to reach the quality of those shown, you’ll be in a very good shape

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